Wim Botha


New Works

6 November - 13 December 2008

Brodie/Stevenson is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new work by Wim Botha.

For his first solo show in Johannesburg since his Standard Bank Young Artist exhibition in 2006, Wim Botha presents a new sculptural installation, large and small individual drawings and recent large-scale prints.

The exhibition is primarily concerned with the passage of time, its origins and implications. The works make use of visual elements that have their origin in the languages of natural history, art history and ancient mythology, and are presented in a semi-structured constellation that seems to suggest a non-linear timeline.

Saturn, or Kronos as the god of time forms a central theme, and links with various other motifs related to traditional depictions of time, or of the god of time himself. This is extended with references to evolution, origin and artificial or induced mutation.

Using as source motif the standard illustrated depiction of time as a sequence of events consecutively arranged according to a linear model, the main installation adapts and perverts this format in three-dimensional space. By means of a suspended construction of hexagonal air-conditioning ducting the flow and passage of time, as well as the depictions of time - often serpent-like - is represented according to various time-line theories: infintite, circular, spiral etc. Turning back on itself, this sequence with its various elements suggests a type of system, a volatile organism with high entropic possibility. The movement of air along an undulating, spiraling and forking path becomes a metaphor for the passage of time itself.

In the two-dimensional works, skeletal studies of human and animal figures in animated poses subject the assumed finality of death as end of time to a longer timeframe. However, in ignorance of possible spiritual dimensions, these works remain in the material realm, hinting at another form of continuity. Two large lino prints subject the original moment depicted in two respective historical artworks to the reality of the intervening time-frame, rendering the moment frozen but in decay, and in the process cleansed of its original meaning.

The gallery is open from Tuesday to Friday, 10:30am to 5:30pm, and Saturday from 9:30am to 3pm.

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